Kristin MacPherson: Through the Eyes of the Artist

Kristin MacPherson: Through the Eyes of the Artist

Most of us are familiar with the saying the eyes are the windows to the soul, but did you know that this isn’t just a metaphor? There is scientific evidence that indicates a person’s eyes really are a window; to their feelings or intentions. Facial expressions can be forced, such as with a smile, but our eyes reveal all so our natural tendency is to avoid excessive eye contact because, for the most part, it makes us feel vulnerable and uncomfortable. The eyes also affirm beauty, peace, happiness, contentment and so many other things that make us want to get to know someone. When we sat down with Kristin MacPherson she revealed to us, not through her eyes, but through her art that it is this physical feature that ignites her curiosity and compels her to want to make people’s faces the subject of many of her paintings and photographs.

Kristin and Lenore

Kristin and Lenore

As with many artists, Kristin grew up in a family of creative people, (parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles) each accompanied with tons of encouragement for Kristin to express herself creatively. When it was time to choose an education the likely candidate was a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree but the perceived reality was to find something that would land her a job. It turns out that photography was the path she would take, and although she didn’t realize it at the time it has played an important role helping her become the artist she is today.

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When we arrived at Kristin’s home where she lives with her husband, three daughters, two dachshunds and her ’53 Buick named Lenore it was easy to see we were entering the home of an artist. There are often signs An Artist Lives Here by the paintings on the wall, or the sculptures on the mantel, but more often than not the art studio is tucked away in a spare room, garage or basement area where the artist has the option of “To be tidy or not to be tidy? That is the question”. In Kristin’s case, the front room is her art studio, up front and center for all who enter the house to see. It was pretty tidy too! An advantage? A disadvantage? Perhaps. Or maybe to Kristin it doesn’t much matter either way. Paraphrasing, she looked at us and said, “it’s the room in the house we don’t use so it just made sense”.

Equality

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Although Kristin took applied photography in school, and it is in itself a form of art, her first love is painting. When I first looked at Kristin’s work I thought she was a watercolour painter but she actually uses acrylics. Her palette usually consists of only five colours and Kristin likes to keep it as simple as that. When she paints, her focus is on the eyes. That is not to say that the rest of the piece is not important but the eyes need to reveal themselves to her before she is satisfied that it is complete. It really excites her when the unexpected happens; the loose brush strokes and the paint gain a mind of their own, overlapping in shapes and patterns and flaunting randomness in such a way it gives the piece a free-spirited look.

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During our interview Kristin proclaimed that she has never taken a painting class and is solely self taught. She did say that it was photography that played a large role in making her a better painter. She spends a lot of time as a professional getting in other peoples faces so to speak. Those close-up shots have given her the opportunity to study the features of the face in great detail and with willing participants. I think the camera provides a barrier between photographer and subject which gives them each a safe place to look into each others eyes. Kristin gets to have a glimpse of the real person behind those eyes and her subject feels relaxed while this takes place. Photography has also enabled Kristin to see the element of light as she paints. Being able to see light and how it wraps itself around objects helps to bring her subjects to life on the canvas.

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Kristin’s fascination with what makes a person tick gives her the exuberance that is needed to go beyond just taking a picture or painting a piece. She works to bring that person out from behind those eyes, to tell their story, to show what really makes them who they are and not what their exterior projects them to be.

We invite you to watch and listen to Kristin as she shares more with us. We encourage you to help us spread the word about Kristin and her art on social media (for your convenience we have provided the buttons below). One more thing; we love comments so please feel free to leave a nice one below. With much gratitude, Corinne and Gary

Visual Artist Ladd Fogarty’s Life of Art and Inspiration

Visual Artist Ladd Fogarty’s Life of Art and Inspiration

"Muscowpetung Sage Woman" - acrylic on canvas

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up” – Pablo Picasso

“What the teacher is, is more important than what he teaches.” – Karl A. Menninger

Our featured interview with multidisciplinary fine artist and retired art teacher Ladd Fogarty of Emerald Park, Saskatchewan reminded me of the above quotes; our discovery of Ladd’s prolific teaching career and what he meant to his students, as well as his life-long passion for the arts and, like Picasso, an appetite for exploring multiple mediums. Although Ladd has been doing his art work for over thirty years now, it hasn’t been until these last eight years that he has truly taken on marketing his work as a professional artist. During the thirty years that he spent teaching students about the arts he fostered not only their creative gifts which led to their own artistic achievements, but he also forged enduring friendships with many of them.

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What is it that makes a great teacher? When we asked Ladd he mentioned not only patience, humour and a diverse skill base, but also the ability to draw out of a person their creative abilities that they never realized was inside of them. One such student was David Benjoe, who was an art student of Ladd’s at age 17 and doubtful of his artistic abilities. Ladd would say to him, “David, please don’t sell yourself short, art is another way to achieve what you enjoy in life”. Then, through Ladd’s urging he agreed to be part of an outreach arts workshop program for the elementary schools in the area, which he loved. This was his first introduction to leading in a classroom setting. He went on to become a teacher himself and is now on the verge of attaining his Masters of fine arts interdisciplinary. David concludes, “I can honestly say that he was the major influence in the path I took after we met way back in the 1990s”.

"Protecting Purity" - birch burl, soapstone, buffalo bone

“Protecting Purity” – birch burl, soapstone, buffalo bone

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The diversity of Ladd’s artistic media came about from various avenues and influences. He attributes personal desire in determining whether he feels like painting at the moment or working with his hands on a 3d object, which may involve acrylic paints, clay, wood, glass or soapstone. It depends on what story he is trying to tell; it could come from the potters wheel or the painting easel. As an art teacher he also had to learn about and present a multitude of mediums for his students to experiment with. His early exposure to art included his mother who was an opera singer and musician and still plays the violin to this day (Ladd also played in a dance band for about 12-15 years until losing a finger five years ago). His grandmother was a painter and his grandfather played the piano. His father happened to be a carpenter that became a master wood-turner in his retirement and was a great teacher for Ladd.

"Parallel Worlds" - acrylic on canvas

“Parallel Worlds” – acrylic on canvas

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Within the wood and clay pieces that Ladd creates you will see striking designs of geometry, figures and symbols; the clay pieces adorned with acrylic paints adding a lustrous finish. For wood he will use accoutrements such as acrylic paints, stained glass, soapstone, buffalo bone, porcupine quills, as well as stones such as turquoise, pipestone, magnesite and jet black. With already the richness of the wood itself to catch your eye, be it maple, birch or cherry, the additional colours and design add a beautiful touch. Ladd notes that when he is working with wood or clay he uses more symbolism and has a tendency to explore more abstract concepts.

"On The Way To Puskwakau" - acrylic on canvas

“On The Way To Puskwakau” – acrylic on canvas

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To Ladd his paintings relay the inspiration he gains from his natural surroundings as well as the experiences of the people who are a part of it. Ladd has a deep connection to First Nations people and their culture and his work reflects that. One such piece is “Muscowpetung Sage Woman”; the painting featured at the top. This piece was created as a donation to a charity auction to raise money for shelters for women and children of domestic violence. It is a personal piece that shows a woman and child, his adopted First Nations daughter with her daughter, looking over her shoulder to an old woman picking sage, a symbolic gesture of acknowledging her ancestral roots. It represents part of the healing process for a difficult time that she was going through.

Turquoise on birch

Turquoise on birch

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We finished up our interview with a tour of the family home to video Ladd’s art work on display; the house itself a part of his artistic handiwork. We had the pleasure of getting to know Ladd’s wife Liz and their daughter Kaitlyn as we sat down to a lovely lunch that they prepared. A stroll through the yard and garden (where we gratefully accepted some veggies for the road) capped off a wonderful day with the Fogartys.

Enjoy our interview with Ladd and please share his interview on social media. If you are inclined to leave a nice comment for Ladd please submit it below.

“Renaissance Man” Artist Jeff Morris

“Renaissance Man” Artist Jeff Morris

"Kayak"

You know the type, a guy that seems to be able to do it all; fix anything, create anything, with the only limitations being that of his own imagination. Meet artist Jeff Morris of Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, a man with a vast imagination and seemingly no limitations to his creativity. When we arrived at his studio and gallery a few miles north of town we thought we were interviewing Jeff Morris the artist, but what we found in addition to that was also an inventor and explorer; a Renaissance man of sorts.

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Jeff Morris has always liked to create things, starting off as a youngster with the basics of a hammer, some wood and some ideas. It seemed like a logical choice then that he go into carpentry after high school, giving him the satisfaction of building functional wood structures and earning a living. And although he enjoyed it, he wasn’t able to unleash the creativity that was brewing inside of him, so he decided to transfer his wood construction skills into his artistic side and put the fun back into functional. The result has been not only beautiful and innovative wood pieces, but also Jeff’s expansion of creativity into other mediums.

"Lava Table" - wood construction

“Lava Table” – wood construction

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When we spoke with Jeff about what drives his art he kept coming back to his thirst for learning and discovery. Always experimenting with different techniques and having no shortage of new ideas, his curiosity is endless and is reflected in the variety of media he has his hands in such as concrete, wood, photography, painting and pottery. While he was giving us a tour of his spacious studio and workshop he also pointed out other inventive projects, such as the drum set he made from used propane cylinders; see video HERE, as well as the new musical instrument he made from the inner workings of a piano. If whiskey and slide guitar are more your style then check out the whiskey tumbler and glass slide that Jeff made from a whiskey bottle; see video HERE.

"Raver" - Assiniboine clay

“Raver” – Assiniboine clay

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Jeff admits that his projects are not based on the path of least resistance principle, and he likes it that way. Rather his methods are based more on his quest to satisfy his curiosity and the inherent challenges that come with it. For instance, buying clay for pottery is not too costly, but his discovery of a clay source along the Assiniboine River while he was out kayaking led him to hand dig and haul out a lifetime supply of clay; an enormous physical task. After testing out the initial few hundred pounds of clay with a couple of local potters and then researching the correct combination of additives to make successful pots, he now uses only the Assiniboine clay for all of his pieces.

Collaboration piece with Fred Acoby

Collaboration piece with Fred Acoby

One of the great messages that we took away from our visit with Jeff was that creating art, or any other project, does not have to involve expensive supplies that can stop you before you begin. If a person has a creative urge just waiting to burst from within them, just a little extra work using re-purposed or scrap items or even paints from a building supply store (Jeff’s not-so-secret supply), can get anyone started. In many cases Jeff’s creativity and innovation has lent itself to just providing the materials themselves for the project before the work on the artistic piece has even begun. Although the proverb “Necessity is the mother of invention” may apply to finding a solution through lack of financial means, for Jeff it means a necessity for trying new, unconventional, or historical methods that stoke his curiosity and that gives him a satisfaction of having taken the road less traveled to discovery. When asked if there were other mediums that he would to like to explore Jeff mentioned glass blowing but that it is quite a pricey endeavour. We don’t doubt that one day, somehow, Jeff will find a way.

Enjoy our interview with Jeff and this glimpse into his artistic life. Feel free to share his story on social media and email, with nice comments submitted below always welcome.

Off-piste with Painter Jenny Baillie

Off-piste with Painter Jenny Baillie

"Orange Bear"

There are many reasons why one would want to visit the charming town of Rossland, tucked within the mountainous south central region of British Columbia. For some it may be for the world class skiing at Red Mountain, for others it could be carving the trails of Canada’s mountain biking capital, while for others a visit to the Rossland Beer Company to whet their whistle would be in order. For us, we were drawn here by the bold and vibrant art work of visual artist Jenny Baillie, and a chance to discover the personality behind the paintbrush.

Jenny Baillie beside her "Women of the Klondike - Mae Field"

Jenny Baillie beside her “Women of the Klondike – Mae Field”

It was the lure of skiing in the Canadian Rockies that drew Jenny first to Banff, Alberta from New Zealand back in 1979, and then on to Rossland, B.C. in 1982. It is there she has called home ever since. The many peaks, lakes and vistas she has encountered throughout the B.C. mountains all called out to her creativity, and she notes that it was through the rigours of skiing, hiking and backpacking that Jenny attributes the initial inspiration for her landscape paintings. She says she, “likes to sweat and suffer in the great outdoors” to help fuel her creativity.

"Lake O'Hara 1"

“Lake O’Hara 1”

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Jenny notes that if she were to put a label on her style of painting that it would be something like, “abstract impressionism with some funk.” She typically uses six colours to create her vivid paintings, but Jenny admits that her goal is to simplify even more to three primary colours, plus black and white. Her subject matter is varied, ranging from her landscapes, to bears and bunnys, super heroes, flowers, comic relief, and a series of historical women, from those of the pioneering and mountaineering ilk, to those of the Klondike Gold Rush fame.

"Women of the Klondike - Kate Carmack"

“Women of the Klondike – Kate Carmack”

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Jenny is never afraid to get out of her comfort zone nor is she at a loss for new ideas. Her eclectic subject matter exhibits her need for self expression; wherever her imagination takes her. At the same time she understands the need to satisfy the market, and so she appeals to her audience with her signature landscape pieces. This is much like a skier who will follow the groomed runs because that is what they have always done, but really wanting the thrill of uncharted territory. Jenny confided to us that her creativity is about to go off-piste once again. We look forward to her new discoveries.

To view more of Jenny’s art work please visit her website by clicking here.

Enjoy our interview with Jenny and please help us spread the word about her art work through sharing on social media and email. Comments below are also welcome!

Meghan Hildebrand’s Passions from Painting to Punk

Meghan Hildebrand’s Passions from Painting to Punk

You Are Left Alone

We were first introduced to Meghan Hildebrand’s work through the social media network. I spotted a painting of her’s someone else had shared and I was intrigued right from the start. It was a painting from her series Rivers and Logs that twigged my curiosity. Meghan lives along the Sunshine Coast of B.C. in Powell River which is historically known for its pulp and paper mill. In its prime this mill was once the largest in the world. The mill still exists but it is a shadow of its former self and now it shares the economy with tourism which stems from experiencing the arts, culture and nature in the area.

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Tinkernackle

Tinkernackle

We arranged to meet Meghan at the Dancing Tree Gallery where she displays some of her work. Meghan’s mother, who was an artist herself, always encouraged Meghan’s interest in art, and so being an artist was always part of her lifelong plan. Meghan is an artistic cartographer of sorts. She creates a series of paintings which she says are best described as story maps. Her paintings are primarily of landscapes depicting an actual place, or they may be more metaphorical depicting an idea of a subject that she wants to explore. Meghan fills her paintings with as many symbols and characters as she can. In many ways her work reminds me of a stylized kind of folk art within the realm of fine art. There are things going on all over the painting and they may be connected to one another, or not. Meghan leaves that for her audience to decide.

Boom Bay

Boom Bay

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Humans are an innately curious species. When our senses are stimulated with something unfamiliar it sparks that sense of wonder. If you look closely at one of Meghan’s paintings you will find yourself becoming lost within it. It draws you in as you follow a twisty road through what may be a cityscape, or you find yourself in the middle of a landscape that reminds you of somewhere you have been or want to go. There are some places that look so fanatastical you wonder what Meghan must have been thinking, so you look to the title for a clue but she gives nothing away there either. She expressed to us that she loves it when someone is left to their own devices to navigate through one of her paintings. That is what a story map does. It gives each person the opportunity to find their own path and discover their own way to the things they want to see within her painting. I think Meghan does an amazing job of this.

Winds and Hazard

Winds and Hazard

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O'Sullivan's Rolling Darkroom

O’Sullivan’s Rolling Darkroom

To see more of Meghan’s work check out her website by clicking here.

Meghan’s other artistic foray started about three years ago when she was invited to try out for an all ladies punk rock band called The Abbie Hoffman Society. She had never performed with a band, but she found herself taking on one of the roles of the five member band and they have been going strong ever since. Meghan says that she surprised herself as to how much she loves performing in front of an audience, especially since it is such a contrast to the singular activity of painting. Her paintings do reveal a free-thinking, non-conventional artist who walks to the beat of her own drum, so to me Meghan seems like an ideal candidate for The Abbie Hoffman Society. To date they have performed in their home town of Powell River, toured parts of British Columbia and released their first CD in 2013.

Have a listen to a track from The Abbie Hoffman Society’s first CD titled Do They Ever.

The Abbie Hoffman Society

The Abbie Hoffman Society

Click on track 1 below to hear Beaver Fever.

To learn more about The Abbie Hoffman Society click here.

Check out Meghan Hildebrand’s interview. We appreciate comments and thank you for helping to spread the word about Meghan through social media and email.

Painter Michelle Pickering’s Peacock Panacea

Painter Michelle Pickering’s Peacock Panacea

Sheds

I have heard many people say, “I don’t have a creative bone in my body.” Luckily creativity does not come from our skeletal structure, it comes from the heart and the brain. The heart provides the inspirational emotion that drives the brain to start the process, do the problem solving and to give it some life. Creativity seems almost mystical at times because it is not something that can easily be explained through words or quantified in labratory tests as to where it comes from. But it does manifest itself in many forms, art being one of them. Creativity, and in particular expressing oneself through the embodiment of something beautiful can change a person’s life. As life is a journey to be lived each and everyday, we live through a myriad of experiences throughout this journey and these can be both deliriously pleasant and intensely unpleasant with everything in between. Michelle Pickering is an acrylic painter from Airdrie, Alberta who came face to face with a diagnosis of lupus and fibromyalgia on her life’s journey and it was art that played a significant role in helping her heal.

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Michelle took fine art in college and painting happened to be her weakest medium. She therefore moved on to other things and did not give it a second thought. Ironically, many years later it would be painting that changed her life. She kept asking her husband for brushes, paints and canvases for Christmas and being the supportive partner that he is he provided all that she needed. The materials sat in the basement for a long time until one day the painter within her awakened and her healing started to begin. Ever since then Michelle’s journey has had strong emphasis on healing herself and teaching others to do the same. As she explained to us healing doesn’t just refer to eliminating physical pain; it can be something emotional, it can be self discovery, it can be finding peace, it can be finding happiness and on and on. Not only has painting taught her to be the artist she is today, it has also taught her so much she didn’t know about herself including the power she has within her.

Peacock

Peacock

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I can guess that Michelle spends a lot of time with her thoughts just like I do. One night while in bed a thought came to her in the form of a peacock. She saw a tiny little bird with a mass of colourful plummage displayed behind him. This peacock became Michelle’s symbol for every single person in the world and how important each and every one of us is no matter how insignificant we may think of ourselves. The peacock’s feathers represent all the beautiful things we have inside us that needs to be displayed to the world. As it turns out this wasn’t just a fleeting thought for Michelle, the peacock needed to become real. Michelle had to share his beauty and consequently the beauty inside herself to the world. She decided to paint Peacock (as he is now referred to) on the garage door. Interestingly enough the world delivered mixed feelings toward Peacock. For most people he put a smile on their face and maybe even initiated positive change in their own lives, and for some they felt animosity towards him. For those people, it is hard to understand what could possibly drive them to hate him so much that they would go so far as to bully Michelle and her family just to have him removed. In the end Peacock stayed and the neighbours moved. Today, Peacock represents all things good and all things possible and that is how Michelle became known as the Peacock Artist.

Destiny

Destiny

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I don’t know if this was Michelle’s conscious intent but I see Peacock in most of what she creates. The colourful, intentional brush stroke patterns in her paintings remind me that Peacock is there; in the sky, in the butterflys, and in the plants. His plummage reminds us all of our importance in the grander picture of life and that we are not separate from each other or from nature, and that those connections are what make life possible in the first place.

To see more of Michelle’s work visit her website by clicking here.

Join us as Michelle shares more about her journey and how art changed her life. We appreciate your comments and please spread the word about Michelle Pickering on social media and through email.

Corinne Cowan Paints the Gardens of Space

Corinne Cowan Paints the Gardens of Space

As a little girl it was a gift of crayons and a colouring book from her grandmother that started artist Corinne Cowan on her path to acrylic and watercolour painting. The thrill of opening that gift is still with her today, and as she pans the room with her arm showing all of her supplies she jokingly points out, “Some people like shoes; I like paint.” Corinne says that she has always connected with painting and finds it to be gratifying and therapeutic, with her two favourite subjects being flowers and outer space. Spending virtually all day in her garden during the summer, she becomes intimately acquainted with the intricacies of the flowers, be it the petal or the pistil, the stamen or the stigma. She is fascinated by the beauty and mystery of their shapes, colour and function, and aims to paint their images based on the emotion she felt and perception of how they looked to her when first glimpsed.

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Corinne’s gardens of inspiration. Click on images to enlarge:

Corinne’s introduction to painting the cosmos was ignited when she first saw an image of a nebula. It was the Rosette Nebula which looked very much like a flower, and likewise instilled in her those feelings of wonder and curiosity. She was drawn to the similar patterns between the mysteries of her garden and that of exploring images of the nebulae, galaxies, meteors and moons. That fascination of the universe and its endless wonders led Corinne to becoming one of four members from Canada belonging to the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA). It is an organization that brings together artists from twenty countries to participate, encourage and collaborate within the space art community.

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It takes no more than a walk through her nurtured garden to inspire Corinne for her next floral painting. On the other hand, accessing the final frontier to paint a birthing planet or morphing star could be a little more challenging. Corinne’s enthusiastic niece suggested that since she heard they were taking reservations for a one-way trip to Mars that her auntie should go. Smiling, Corinne opted instead for a more down-to-earth method to gather inspiration for her space paintings. Leaving it to accomplished space pioneer and astronaut Chris Hadfield to uncover and report on the space action, it was a constant attraction for Corinne and her niece to listen to and watch him on the computer. Closer to home Corinne reads extensively about space, receives guidance from the hundreds of images brought back to earth from the Hubble Telescope, and draws on her own curiosity and imagination to fuel the fire for her stellar subjects.

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Corinne’s love of art is in the mystery that keeps her curious, searching and expressing her emotions on canvas; it is witnessing the change of a flower through one season, or the change of a star forming over a twelve year period; it is the community of artists that she appreciates being a part of with the honest critique and praise that helps her grow; it is sharing this passion with an eager participant such as a weekend spent painting with her niece; it is the appreciation from people that purchase her paintings that know they have a little piece of Corinne in every one; and perhaps the most important of all for Corinne, simply stated is, “It’s an enjoyable thing to do.”

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Painter Sandy Troudt’s Colourful Classroom

Painter Sandy Troudt’s Colourful Classroom

Worth More Than Gold

Life is a journey of discovery and learning, and the mediums for personal and professional exploration are endless. For some that inquisitive fervour may take them into the natural or social sciences, for others it could be a trip to the moon and back, while still others may devote their life to training their bodies and minds in the martial arts. For artist Sandy Troudt that constant curiosity has been a life-long journey into the artistic realm of her paintings, print making and mixed media. For as long as she can remember Sandy has always wanted to paint, and it was a wonderful experience in seventh grade that affirmed her need to pursue it. As a career educator she shared that passion with her elementary students and other teachers alike through curriculum and workshops. Sandy recognizes that her own learning has evolved from mentoring by many notable artists as well as an arts community which provides another integral part to the growth experience and personal artistic journey. Unable to seriously devote her time to art while dedicating thirty-two years to teaching, it was upon retirement that Sandy now felt it was her time to pursue her passion in earnest, and that thirst for learning and her pleasure for the paint brush has never waned.

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Patchwork

Patchwork

Sandy and her husband Dennis live in the house they built in a picturesque rural area outside of Fort St. John. It is a place devoid of traffic noise and city lights, where the only onlookers might be a deer, a moose, or any one of nature’s wild inhabitants indigenous to the Peace region. It was this beauty and proximity to the wilderness that attracted them to this area, and Sandy draws endless inspiration from this natural environment. It is also an area rich in history from a pioneering way of life, and Sandy marvels at the challenges that the early settlers faced. The remnants of those bygone days still cling to the present whether as a rusting old truck, farm implement or weathered and sagging barn. They all provide engaging subject matter for Sandy’s creativity.

Diva Winter

Diva Winter

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With her appetite for discovery, Sandy has always pursued a variety of art media. She believes that the learning one gains from working with one medium can easily transfer to using another. She loves change and is always trying to find a better way of doing things. Sandy will ask herself, “What if I did this or tried that?” and admits that it is sometimes difficult to stay on track with her enquiring mind eager to get started on new ideas. With one painting finished and a lesson or two learned she is off on another adventure of problem solving and the joy of discovery begins once again.

Patty

Patty

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Sandy’s paintings will grab your attention; the bold colours and contrasts inviting you in for a closer look. The scene is appealing and recognizable yet gives in to the imagination and loses the strict boundaries of realism. The effect is eye-catching, and is meant to evoke emotion rather than just recognition. Sandy notes that colour relationships are very important Capturing the essence and liveliness of the scene that she felt when first witnessing it is her goal and what she hopes to portray to others. Sandy will paint from a photograph but the similarity ends there. She notes, “I do not want anything I paint to look just like the photograph. I want to liven things up a bit…a photo reference is only the beginning…so I go a bit crazy sometimes…I can’t help it!” Chatting with Sandy her enthusiasm is palpable, and the joie de vivre she exhibits lives on through her art work.

Olé

Olé

For Sandy the joy of being an artist is the fun of experimenting, the discovery of new techniques, colour variations that really work together, and the thrill of change. Adhering to the guidelines of colour theory, composition and balance is still important, but allowing uninhibited creative license to amuse and amaze herself is essential to following her passion. To enjoy more of Sandy’s art work (click here) to access her website.

Enjoy our interview with Sandy and we welcome you to comment below and share on social media and through email.

Mixed Media Artist Lori Fell Follows Her Painted Path

Mixed Media Artist Lori Fell Follows Her Painted Path

As we drove away from the Yukon, in Arty’s wake we left behind a piece of our heart, some new friends and some pretty spectacular scenery. Heading down the road back into British Columbia we carried with us a library full of memories from roads once traveled, the gifts of that day; the majestic Rocky Mountains and several burly bison, as well as the anticipation of future encounters and things left to be discovered. On our way to Fort Nelson, B.C. we had one day before our next interview so we planned to stop at Liard River hot springs. Have you ever heard of that list of a thousand things you should do before you die? Well, going to Liard was on our list. It was all that I imagined (hot) and more (super hot) but it was a soothing ending to the completion of twenty-three interviews in twenty-one days. The next day we were back in Arty’s saddle again and off to Fort Nelson to find out all about mixed media artist Lori Fell.

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Lori grew up in northern B.C. where the deer and the bison roam and the majestic mountains linger all day. She is grateful to have lived and played among the trees; to this day a connection which she cherishes deeply. Lori’s painted path began several years ago. She is a self professed lover of all things art and has always been creative, but it wasn’t until a tragedy struck her family and she needed a means to heal that she found painting. Nature as a subject matter was an obvious choice for Lori and so began her painted path (see her website) and process for which to heal.

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One of the challenges facing artists in more remote communities is the absence of varied face-to-face art learning opportunities. Lori is primarily self-taught but she did say that she has spent a great deal of time on the internet, specifically YouTube, where she has gleaned ideas and learned many new things that have helped develop her into the artist she is today. When I first laid eyes on Lori’s paintings it was the colour that grabbed me. I think vibrancy can be so irresitible, and it definitely has its time and place in Lori’s work. It wasn’t just the colour that caught my eye, as I looked closer I could see the intricate swirls and shapes within the landscape, trees and even the animals. Lori uses special pens to create this effect and she does it with such precision. Human vision is adept at catching things that are uneven and when I look at her work nothing pokes me in the eye.

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When we look with our eyes we see only the outer embodiment of the tree, flower or animal and when we look with our heart we see its spirit. I think Lori has seen the spirit of nature all her life and she shares it with us by illustrating not the bark of the tree or the fur of the animal but the essence of its spirit. We get to see that essence in her paintings. I identify with this connection because it is not what we see but what we feel that makes art really special.

Please join us as Lori Fell shares her journey down her painted path. We value your comments and appreciate it if you would help us spread the word about Lori by sharing on social media and through email.

Painter Phyllis Bergeron Finds Her Colourful Calling

Painter Phyllis Bergeron Finds Her Colourful Calling

Home of the Sign Post Forest, our arrival in Watson Lake coincided with acrylic painter Phyllis Bergeron and her husband’s plans to take off in their motor-home to Saskatchewan for a wedding. Along the way they would be dropping off seven puppies in Edmonton as part of the animal rescue program. Busy with her preparations, she initially thought we were there as art dealers and buyers, and was surprised when we asked if she was ready to start the interview. Her Smart car was already stored inside her studio/gallery, filling most of the floor space and her paintings occupying the walls all around. Unfazed, and with a quick wit and sense of humour, Phyllis easily went with the flow and we carried on as if the car had always been part of the decor.

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Phyllis has been painting for the last seven of the thirty-eight years she has lived in the Yukon and has done so without any formal training. Originally picking up a paint brush while in Mexico, she initially used Mexican cement paint to get a feel for it and to see if painting was for her. With a Mexican influence, her painting style is colourful and lively, much like her own personality as you will discover watching her video interview. Phyllis quips, “I paint in acrylics mainly because since the change of life I don’t have as much patience to wait for that paint to dry.” Originally painting flowers, she has deviated from this subject matter to focus more on animals and people and the stories that they tell.

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Phyllis not only gains inspiration from her Mexican subjects but also from the denizens of her home territory in the Yukon. With an abundance of wildlife to photograph, she loves to capture the essence of them in vivid colour depicting their social behaviours or just a pose in time. With the mosquitoes and black flies most likely larger and more abundant in the Yukon than around the Saskatchewan farm where she grew up, Phyllis prefers to paint from a picture as opposed to en plein air; not wishing to share her paintings, or her flesh, with the bloodthirsty beasties. An obvious lover of animals, Phyllis brought out one of the fuzzy puppies for a quick visit and snuggle before they were tucked away in the motor-home for their trip; a fitting end to our interview.

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Please join us for Phyllis’s video interview and feel free to Comment below and Share on social media: