Parsons Dietrich Pottery Fires Form and Function

Parsons Dietrich Pottery Fires Form and Function

Today we went to church. Or rather, it used to be a church, now it is a pottery studio/gallery and the creators we were meeting this day were Wendy, Zach and Devon, a family of ceramic artists and owners of Parsons Dietrich Pottery in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Prior to being moved to its current location by the previous owners, the little church had been abandoned and last used in the 1960s. As we walked through the front doors to the wonderfully displayed gallery, we thought what better venue to create and display artistic and functional ceramics than a building of unique architecture and a work of art on its own? While we waited for Wendy to finish up with some customers Zach took us on an educational tour of the studio; explaining the processes, equipment, glazes and function of their kilns, which include wood, gas, electric and soon-to-be soda-fired.

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Wendy Parsons and Zach Dietrich have had their hands in the clay for over forty years now, and the road to their historic church storefront started in the 1970s when they met at university in Regina. A pioneering spirit then led them to a three year adventure in northern Saskatchewan building a log cabin, growing a garden and building a wood-fired kiln in a back-to-the-land lifestyle. The hard work was satisfying but the isolation of their homestead did not serve their needs for reaching the “outside” world with their pottery. So in 1980 they moved to Moose Jaw; first renting out the church basement for pottery production and then eventually buying the building.

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We’ve all heard the stereotypical concern of parents worried about their children going off to become an artist as opposed to getting a “real” job. Fortunately, their son Devon grew up without those preconceptions; his parents quashing any doubts by their own example, with Zach and Wendy finding early on in their careers a receptive public buying their work. They realized back then at these sold-out fairs that they could indeed make a living selling pottery. Apprenticing under his parents, Devon now has many years of pottery throwing and hand-building under his belt and is continuing to develop his own style.

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Zach, Wendy and Devon each contribute to the business in their own ways and with their own style and preference to form. Wendy loves to teach, and will provide workshops to supplement the pottery production. Her style lends itself to both the figurative and fun side as well as the artistic narrative side. She loves to tell a story through her pieces, and her ’roundel series’ exemplifies that quality. She had interviewed numerous farmers and learned of their stories of life on the farm, including hardship and perseverance in the face of daunting circumstances, be it from low grain prices, havoc-wreaking weather, or diseased livestock. These roundels tell their story. Her artistry also shines in her figurative pieces, whether on her own or in collaborated works with Zach such as on the cookie jars and tea pots.

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With tongue in cheek, Zach notes that his germanic heritage encourages pottery production…and more pottery production! Undeniably his decades of experience throwing clay shows in the yielding of many beautiful and elegant functional pieces of pottery, and he admits that he is gratified more by bringing well-turned pieces into the world than on other more time consuming works. But on occasion Zach has stepped away from his prolific specialty to indulge in other interesting projects, such as the series of tile wall pieces he created and framed in wood, or a school project where the children made tiles from start to finish and were then attached to a constructed wood bench.

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Devon enjoys specializing in the hand-building methods of clay including both figurative works as well as experimenting with different functional designs, such as his wave handle mug, a signature piece of his. Being science-minded he also takes on the task of testing out and mixing the different glazes to see which ones will be suitable for their clay pieces, both in consistency and colour. The three potters will also collaborate on work, helping to glaze each other’s pieces or decorating with hand-building to arrive at the finished product.

So when you are passing by Moose Jaw on the highway and you see the little white church of Parsons Dietrich Pottery, stop in to say hi to Wendy, Zach and Devon and take a look around.

Enjoy our video interview below and feel free to share on social media. Nice comments are always welcome too!

Visual Artist Ladd Fogarty’s Life of Art and Inspiration

Visual Artist Ladd Fogarty’s Life of Art and Inspiration

"Muscowpetung Sage Woman" - acrylic on canvas

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up” – Pablo Picasso

“What the teacher is, is more important than what he teaches.” – Karl A. Menninger

Our featured interview with multidisciplinary fine artist and retired art teacher Ladd Fogarty of Emerald Park, Saskatchewan reminded me of the above quotes; our discovery of Ladd’s prolific teaching career and what he meant to his students, as well as his life-long passion for the arts and, like Picasso, an appetite for exploring multiple mediums. Although Ladd has been doing his art work for over thirty years now, it hasn’t been until these last eight years that he has truly taken on marketing his work as a professional artist. During the thirty years that he spent teaching students about the arts he fostered not only their creative gifts which led to their own artistic achievements, but he also forged enduring friendships with many of them.

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What is it that makes a great teacher? When we asked Ladd he mentioned not only patience, humour and a diverse skill base, but also the ability to draw out of a person their creative abilities that they never realized was inside of them. One such student was David Benjoe, who was an art student of Ladd’s at age 17 and doubtful of his artistic abilities. Ladd would say to him, “David, please don’t sell yourself short, art is another way to achieve what you enjoy in life”. Then, through Ladd’s urging he agreed to be part of an outreach arts workshop program for the elementary schools in the area, which he loved. This was his first introduction to leading in a classroom setting. He went on to become a teacher himself and is now on the verge of attaining his Masters of fine arts interdisciplinary. David concludes, “I can honestly say that he was the major influence in the path I took after we met way back in the 1990s”.

"Protecting Purity" - birch burl, soapstone, buffalo bone

“Protecting Purity” – birch burl, soapstone, buffalo bone

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The diversity of Ladd’s artistic media came about from various avenues and influences. He attributes personal desire in determining whether he feels like painting at the moment or working with his hands on a 3d object, which may involve acrylic paints, clay, wood, glass or soapstone. It depends on what story he is trying to tell; it could come from the potters wheel or the painting easel. As an art teacher he also had to learn about and present a multitude of mediums for his students to experiment with. His early exposure to art included his mother who was an opera singer and musician and still plays the violin to this day (Ladd also played in a dance band for about 12-15 years until losing a finger five years ago). His grandmother was a painter and his grandfather played the piano. His father happened to be a carpenter that became a master wood-turner in his retirement and was a great teacher for Ladd.

"Parallel Worlds" - acrylic on canvas

“Parallel Worlds” – acrylic on canvas

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Within the wood and clay pieces that Ladd creates you will see striking designs of geometry, figures and symbols; the clay pieces adorned with acrylic paints adding a lustrous finish. For wood he will use accoutrements such as acrylic paints, stained glass, soapstone, buffalo bone, porcupine quills, as well as stones such as turquoise, pipestone, magnesite and jet black. With already the richness of the wood itself to catch your eye, be it maple, birch or cherry, the additional colours and design add a beautiful touch. Ladd notes that when he is working with wood or clay he uses more symbolism and has a tendency to explore more abstract concepts.

"On The Way To Puskwakau" - acrylic on canvas

“On The Way To Puskwakau” – acrylic on canvas

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To Ladd his paintings relay the inspiration he gains from his natural surroundings as well as the experiences of the people who are a part of it. Ladd has a deep connection to First Nations people and their culture and his work reflects that. One such piece is “Muscowpetung Sage Woman”; the painting featured at the top. This piece was created as a donation to a charity auction to raise money for shelters for women and children of domestic violence. It is a personal piece that shows a woman and child, his adopted First Nations daughter with her daughter, looking over her shoulder to an old woman picking sage, a symbolic gesture of acknowledging her ancestral roots. It represents part of the healing process for a difficult time that she was going through.

Turquoise on birch

Turquoise on birch

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We finished up our interview with a tour of the family home to video Ladd’s art work on display; the house itself a part of his artistic handiwork. We had the pleasure of getting to know Ladd’s wife Liz and their daughter Kaitlyn as we sat down to a lovely lunch that they prepared. A stroll through the yard and garden (where we gratefully accepted some veggies for the road) capped off a wonderful day with the Fogartys.

Enjoy our interview with Ladd and please share his interview on social media. If you are inclined to leave a nice comment for Ladd please submit it below.

The Musings and Amusings of Ceramic Artist Jordan Van Sewell

The Musings and Amusings of Ceramic Artist Jordan Van Sewell

"Devil's Wrecking Ball"

As we strolled around ceramic artiste Jordan Van Sewell’s yard in Winnipeg, Manitoba we couldn’t help but exclaim, “What the…?”, or “What is that?”, or “Hey, take a look at this!”. Amongst the gardens of flowers, grapes, vegetables and crack corn (yes, actual corn stalks growing through the asphalt crack), one will get a glimpse of the many interesting collectibles, found items and projects that decorate his yard. Stepping into his studio and workshop the intrigued visitor will then be met with many of Jordan’s signature ceramic pieces; icons such as Charlie Brown and David Bowie, the devil bathing with his trusty three headed dog beside him, various humanoids and anthropomorphic animals, his robot and skeleton statue minions peering into the “hell hole” dug in the back yard, as well as a good selection of creepy and sinister looking characters. Welcome to the eclectic world of Jordan Van Sewell and his art work.

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Jordan started his professional art career after finishing art school in 1979, and it was these rudimentary skills learned in clay that had given him, as he puts it, “a whole new vocabulary”. Things that meant something to him but that were not expressed, or that could not be acquired elsewhere, could now be created from his own interpretation of the world into his clay pieces, with an enhanced twist to make for a “better read”. The plight and the fortunes of the human construct that Jordan characterizes in his work are meant to evoke empathy and humour, and he observes that the more people become familiar with his work the more the subtle nature of their concepts will be revealed. On the flip side, some of his pieces are just for fun.

"Grosz' Revisited"

“Grosz’ Revisited”

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One look at Jordan’s big, burly, growly, flames-painted Harley Davidson, complete with…doilies? painted on the back luggage carriers, and you will know that here’s a guy that walks to the beat of his own drum. Being unconventional has always been a part of Jordan’s life, sometimes out of necessity, and it shows in the body of work he has created depicting variations of pop-culture symbols and the human condition. As we looked at his collection of ceramic characters they can’t help but make you smile, chuckle or ponder the symbolism, and if these creations don’t clue you in to Jordan’s sense of humour then speaking with him certainly will. His deadpan humour flowed seamlessly in and out of “serious” discussion, occasionally requiring a double-take from us to see if he was pulling our leg, like when he introduced his cat Pearl who keeps the mice and small children in check.

"Tattoo"

“Tattoo”

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Jordan reveals that he started out with the same struggles that any aspiring artist goes through (more ramen noodles?), but despite that he knows that being an artist was always something that he was born to do, rendering himself as he says, “virtually unemployable”. A big part of the “high” is not only the therapeutic process of creating his art, and the magic in the mixture between the intellect, skills and excitement, but also seeing his work in other peoples’ homes and how it has affected them. The significance for them strengthens his own feelings about his body of work. All said, Jordan Van Sewell’s thirty seven years as a professional artist, and loving it to this day, is a great testament to the qualities that got him to where he is today; perseverance and being true to yourself.

We invite you to meet Jordan Van Sewell in our video interview and to help spread the word about him and his art work through social media and email, and a nice comment is always welcome too.

Sandy Christensen’s Clayful Characters

Sandy Christensen’s Clayful Characters

"Old Age and Beauty"

As we traveled south along highway #2 towards Watrous, Saskatchewan for our interview with ceramic artist Sandy Christensen, the sheen of Little Manitou Lake came into view as the gentle relief of land gave way to its shores. It was inevitable that we would visit these therapeutic mineral rich waters for a soak and a float, known as the “Dead Sea of Canada” and one of only three such bodies of water in the world. It was there at Manitou Beach that we also learned the history of Danceland, a 5000 square foot horse hair dance floor that has been around since 1928. Our spontaneous tour of this historic building came from 85 year old Ken Mackie, a veteran dance participant walking laps around the perimeter of the expansive dance floor at about 5 miles per day. Ken has a sharp wit, is humourous, and is an interesting fellow with many stories to tell. It is ironic that we met Ken before Sandy not knowing that he could have been the subject of inspiration for one of Sandy’s creative clay characters.

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Sandy Christensen has always had an affinity for clay, even as a young girl making mud pies. So it was serendipitous that when a woman who had moved back to the area and began teaching pottery lessons that Sandy jumped in and didn’t look back. Without this turn of events she notes that she may have done any number of other activities and never truly found the love for clay. Sandy soon discovered that even though she enjoyed making pots on the turning wheel, what she really loved was hand-building.

"Coffeetime"

“Coffeetime”

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Sandy loves to create ceramic characters and the stories they tell. In her completed works you will see playful youngsters doing what they typically do, familiar sibling interactions, and one little girl taking a stubborn stand against her father to protest…(insert your imagination here). But above all you will see what Sandy loves to create most, the venerable elders such as Ken, with their character lines and endless stories as she catches the essence of these “real” people in their daily lives.

"The Grass is Always Greener..."

“The Grass is Always Greener…”

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Many times Sandy will get commission statues to do for a member of someone’s family, and if that family truly knows the subject; how they dress, hobbies and especially funny quirks or memorable past situations, then Sandy will strive to capture that in her piece. She knows she has nailed it when the unveiling of the characterization evokes fits of laughter. So true to character is Sandy’s interpretation that families occasionally display pieces at funerals as fond remembrances of their loved ones.

"The Conversation"

“The Conversation”

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Sandy reveals that one of her favourite past-times is people watching, and so it makes sense that many of her ideas comes from observing how people look, what they say and what they are doing. She has noticed that if you look at people from a certain region, maybe from a certain occupation or of a certain advanced age, they tend to look very much alike. She notes that as we get older many of us will acquire a similar body shape, the greying hair and usually prescription glasses, revealing a stereotype that she enjoys incorporating into her art work. It is said that the eyes are the window to the soul. For Sandy’s pieces it is the face that is the window to the character. Although everything is important and must be in proportion, Sandy spends the most time on the face, trying to get the accurate likeness of the person and evoking the desired expression. What matters to Sandy is that these little clay characters make you smile.

Enjoy our interview with Sandy and please feel free to share her interview on social media and email. Comments are welcome too!

A Moment in Time with Sculptor Sandra Grace Storey

A Moment in Time with Sculptor Sandra Grace Storey

Swimming Caribou by Sandra Grace Storey

Our trip to the Yukon was certainly made pleasurable by the many talented and personable artists we met, but was also heightened by the expectation of glimpsing some of its local wildlife; possibly a wolf, a grizzly bear, or even that native northern ungulate, the caribou. What is the excitement, the awe, the breath quickly drawn in that we feel as we become aware of each others presence? Is there a bond or commonality that we humans share with these beasts? Are there subtle communications between us borne from ancient interactions with one another? What messages and stories are being sent to us that warrant reflection, and future action? Clay sculptor Sandra Grace Storey shares with us her exploration into some of these questions through her narrative art work.

Sculptor Sandra Grace Storey

Sculptor Sandra Grace Storey

Born and raised in the Yukon, Sandra has always had a connection to nature and its wild inhabitants. She notes that encounters with wildlife and meeting them eye to eye is a humbling experience and always invokes a feeling of wonder and awe. It is also a world that differs greatly from her early childhood when she suffered from asthma and was confined to an oxygen tent for great lengths of time. It was a sensory deprived environment that dissociated Sandra from the “outside” world. There was not much else for her to do but read to pass the time and so she indulged in tales of folklore, fables and Greek mythology. Ironically it was reading about these stories that was a catalyst to her current passion for exploring, creating stories and mythologizing her clay sculptures.

Messenger Snowy Owl

Messenger Snowy Owl

Using human and animal figures, Sandra’s sculptures are metaphors for various aspects of life where she seeks to capture a moment in time of a particular story or happening, possibly with one of the many animals she has encountered during her lifetime. With unspoken communication Sandra celebrates this “gift” that these animals have given her by memorializing them in clay. The protagonist of her story may well be a raven, an owl, a rabbit or a bear; appearing as shamans and donning cloaks to hide their true power. Sandra believes that stories make us who we are, and we are all a culmination of our own life’s events. In essence, the stories are about what has already happened, the communication and messages we receive from our environment and how we respond to them helps to build the next chapter in our life.

I Am

I Am

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We asked Sandra why she likes to work with clay and her answer was quite profound. Besides the soft, tactile pleasure of handling the clay, she finds it soothing; almost meditative. Despite whatever emotions she may bring to the start of a piece, working with the clay seems to have a poultice effect, taking that energy from her and releasing it, allowing her to shape the piece with a clear and calm mind. In the end the piece almost always expresses a compassionate and calm demeanor, a reflection of her own emotional transformation. It’s almost mystical, as if the clay itself had intention.

Pompous Rabbit Shaman

Pompous Rabbit Shaman


Sandra’s clay works are intriguing. Sometimes they answer questions we may have about our own lives, and sometimes they lead to more questions. They stimulate our imagination and curiosity and help to strengthen our bonds with nature. They are loving and caring and certainly enjoyable to look at.

Enjoy our interview with Sandra below. We welcome Comments and Sharing on social media.

Judi Dyelle and Robin Hopper – Purveyors of Fine Pottery

Judi Dyelle and Robin Hopper – Purveyors of Fine Pottery

Elegant and refined; bold and colourful! Are these the descriptions of Judi Dyelle and Robin Hopper’s pottery, or their respective personalities? Perhaps they are a bit of both! We had the pleasure of meeting up with these two experienced, award winning artists and teachers at their home in Metchosin, B.C.; also home to their studios and gallery at ‘Chosin Pottery. Our approach along their horseshoe shaped driveway wending through the forested front yard gave us a glimpse into the natural setting that they not only call their home, but their inspiration! The incredible gardens and architecture throughout their property were created by Robin and inspired from a Japanese design; the feat quite aptly named the “Anglojapanadian” garden.

Judi Dyelle

Judi Dyelle


Robin Hopper

Robin Hopper

Before we started the formal part of our interview, we sat with Judi and Robin at their dining room table to get acquainted. We were surrounded by a world of handmade furnishings, both functional and decorative, including the mugs we sipped our green tea from. Robin was talking about how much research, trial and error went into actualizing the perfect mug. Considerations to examine were: Is it too heavy or too light? Does it cause me to dribble? Are my fingers comfortable? Do they get squished or are they too loose causing slippage? Is it top heavy and tippy? These questions and more were carefully scrutinized before arriving at an aesthetic form with the proper function; and sure enough, there was something so much more gratifying about the “feeling” of my mug of green tea and knowing what went into making it and who made it. We didn’t realize then that this topic was a preamble to Robin and Judi’s interview and their thoughts about not only the historical cultural importance of pottery, but why it should be of present day cultural importance.

Judi Dyelle

Judi Dyelle


Robin Hopper

Robin Hopper

Judi is a potter with a passion for Oriental ceramics! Her extensive studies in art school combined with studying for a year and a half in Japan had not only added to her collective experience for teaching pottery across Canada and the U.S., but also her love for it! She enjoys working mainly in porcelain, preferring to use it as a very fine and delicate clay body incorporating piercing, cutting and textures into her work. She notes that porcelain is an amazing substance; fragile while working with it but once fired in the kiln is stronger than ceramic and does not chip easily. She also demonstrated the rich “bell” sound one of her bowls made, revealing another sense that reaps the artistic rewards (Play ‘Porcelain Song’ below). Judy notes that the form of her vessels are unequivocally first priority, with the finishing process such as glazes secondary and used to accentuate the piece. She does not paint her work and for that reason the glazes she develops are very important in order to embellish the form of the vessel appropriately.

‘Porcelain Song’:

Judi Dyelle

Judi Dyelle

Make sure to click on Judi’s images below for a closer look:

Robin’s foray into pottery was more like a trial by fire when we was three years old! His introduction to clay happened during the bombing of London in World War II when the shells would crater the land and displace the sub-surface clay upwards, giving him an endless supply to play and work with. Well after those beginnings and his ensuing art school training in his late twenties, Robin traveled and taught pottery around the world on most of the continents and has had his creative hands in many mediums and endeavours ever since. Authoring six books, creating educational DVDs based on those books and designing a world class garden are but a few of his comprehensive pursuits outside of the many hours of “pushing clay around.” His initial art training was in painting and drawing and it has always been at the core of his ceramic work. His latest interest draws on those skills and involves glaze paintings on a porcelain-like substrate and then firing it in the kiln giving it a wonderfully vivid and textured effect, as seen below.

Robin Hopper

Robin Hopper

Make sure to click on Robin’s images below for a closer look:

Both Robin and Judi commented on their fascination with ancient cultures that used pottery for their everyday needs, with various cultures still utilizing their pottery-ware today as an integral part of their lives, be it for practical or ceremonial purposes; usually both. Judi relates how in Japan and Korea these simple ceramic dishes bring on a beauty of their own through the ceremony of eating and gathering of family and friends. This fundamental appreciation for food and family does not harmonize with our fast-food and throw-away culture in North America. Robin notes that he has followed the history of pottery which has followed the history of humans; clay being a necessary part of ancient cultures as they produced items for eating out of or for cooking with, many times the vessel being created for a specific food or dish. These were not mass produced factory items with no personal connection, they were cherished pieces tied irrevocably to the family’s social structure just from the act of making them with their hands, or knowing who did. It is Judi and Robin’s hope that North American society can adopt such heartfelt customs once again, bringing back to the family table not only the family, but a less instant way of life and one closer to the the earth, and clay!

Join Robin and Judi in their gallery as they “turn” us on to pottery! Please share with social media and feel free to leave a comment below!

Pat Jackson Reveals Small is Beautiful

Pat Jackson Reveals Small is Beautiful

Hartney, Manitoba was the first place we decided to try out our new artist finding strategy. This entailed asking the local folks if there are any fine artists or crafts people in town. In Hartney I went into the town office and inquired with a lady behind the front desk and also with Dawn the librarian. At first they had trouble coming up with anyone but soon names were rolling off their tongues and Dawn even volunteered to help by calling a few on my behalf. I should have clarified that we couldn’t interview all of them but we managed to arrange two interviews and one of them being Pat Jackson.

Pat is an artist who creates miniature porcelain dolls. She began working with standard sized dolls, but due to an unfortunate accident left her unable to manage the larger size and so she began working in miniature and as she says, became hooked. She pours her own porcelain into premade molds and she also does her own original castings which usually are one of a kind. The faces are hand painted and each layer of porcelain paint requires eight hours of time in the kiln. Upon completion, Pat then looks for the ideal fabric to make the dolls clothing, even the underwear is authentic to that period of time. As Pat was explaining to us what she does, I continued to be amazed at the patience this woman must have. She says this is one of the benefits of living in a small town where there are less distractions and in her case her dolls are a great way to occupy her time.

Pat designs and makes her own settings and accessories as well. Her Victorian and Edwardian dolls have the furniture appropriate for the period and accompanied by adornments of flowers. I was astounded to learn that a vase (which was a miniature brass candle holder) of paper iris’s were all painted and assembled by hand. Each bloom was the size of a lady bug. She even needed some camouflage material for a male doll she made to represent the soldiers coming home for Christmas. There is no fabic with the tiny camouflage pattern she required so it was hand painted on. It seems there is no limitation to Pat’s imagination when it comes to finding materials to suit her particular needs and she is constantly utilizing found things. One day while grooming her dog, she saw the need to create a miniature dog that resembled her pet and she used scraps of her pooches hair to get the job done. She also asked her daughter Niquie if she would donate a snippet of her hair to authenticate the original miniature Niquie baby doll. I must say that the resemblance of the dolls to their living counterparts is uncanny.

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The research, care and detail that Pat puts into these very tiny dolls is nothing less than astounding and from what I can see there isn’t anything she has left out. Some of the details are so small you would need a magnifying glass in order not to miss anything.

Watch Pat’s interview and see for yourself what I mean. We welcome you to leave a comment for Pat as well.

Annette ten Cate Works Figuratively

Annette ten Cate Works Figuratively

Gary and I couldn’t have picked a better group of people to seek out across Canada than artists. We continually find amazingly talented people and also the kind of people we just want to be around. We were introduced to Annette ten Cate during our impromptu visit to Medalta. It was such a wonderfully unexpected encounter. Annette is a figurative ceramicist who is doing a one year residency at the Shaw International Centre for Contemporary Ceramics. She carefully sculpts people and sometimes pets which she puts into print context for three dimensional illustrations. They will become the characters in books, album covers and family portraits.

Although the figures are simple in detail they depict very human characterstics. They have habits, behaviours and attitudes toward various everyday happenings in peoples lives. There is life in Annette’s clay people. When she was introducing us to the families, couples and children, I could recognize people I know and even myself in some of them. In the “Class Photo”, the little boy in the front row on the end I recognized for sure from school days gone by. Everyone has known someone like him before. His body language has defiance written all over it. The couple on the couch with all the dogs is my friend Tammy and her pack and my aunt is showing the poodle at the dog show (seen in the video).

Annette reminds me of a female Norman Rockwell working in clay. I used to love looking at Norman Rockwell’s paintings. They made me smile because they represented everyday life back in a time when life was simple. I felt that same way looking at Annette’s clay people. I can see why she says she hasn’t stopped smiling since she began working figuratively.

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Check out our video interview with Annette ten Cate as she introduces us to her clay people. Comments are happily accepted.

Annette ten Cate Figurative Ceramicist from Corinne and Gary Funk on Vimeo.